Doctor of Philosophy in Metropolitan Planning, Policy, and Design

The doctoral degree in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design helps meet society’s need for researchers, scholars, teachers, and leaders to make our metropolitan areas sustainable and resilient. The role of the degree in the future of the region and the nation is reflected in its title: The planning challenge is to anticipate change and learn how best to manage it; the policy challenge is how to craft and implement policies needed to facilitate desired change; and the design challenge is how to shape the built environment to achieve desired outcomes. The degree is managed by the Department of City & Metropolitan Planning and is designed to facilitate the interdisciplinary culture of the University of Utah.

Depending on the nature of prior graduate work, the doctoral degree will require between 61 and 83 credit hours, or more, and extend a minimum of six full time semesters of course work. The degree includes core, dissertation field, qualifying examination, and dissertation benchmarks. The core is composed of a sequence of semester-long doctoral seminars in metropolitan planning, metropolitan policy, metropolitan design, research design, technical writing, and teaching methods, and a 1-credit seminar for a total of 19 credits. (Students without a master degree in planning will need to take up to 22 credits in core planning courses.) Doctoral students will complete a minimum of 15 credits in a “dissertation” field including courses outside the Department. The qualifying examination will demonstrate the ability of the candidate to undertake independent research through the preparation of a paper sufficient for submission to a scholarly journal; the paper itself will include literature review, theory, research design, research execution, findings, and conclusions. The dissertation will then be proposed, prepared, and defended.

Applicants are normally expected to have a masters degree in planning, policy, design, or related field, though exceptional candidates with bachelors degrees and substantial related professional experience may be admitted to pursue the masters and Ph.D. Programs in planning concurrently. In addition to Graduate School application forms and transcripts, all applicants must submit GRE scores, resume, two letters of reference, writing and/or other portfolio samples, statement of interest, presentation of a dissertation topic, and where feasible campus visits.

The deadline for admissions is January 15 for the following fall. No applications are accepted for January admission.

Program of Study

Student Publications

Doctoral Independent Study Approval Form

Reid Ewing
Professor, City & Metropolitan Planning, University of Utah
Coordinator of the Doctoral Program, City & Metropolitan Planning, University of Utah
Email: ewing@arch.utah.edu
Phone: 801-581-8255

Summary
The Ph.D. in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design helps meet society’s need for researchers, scholars,
teachers, and leaders to make our metropolitan areas sustainable and resilient. The degree is managed by
the Department of City & Metropolitan Planning in the College of Architecture + Planning but it is designed
to facilitate the interdisciplinary culture of the University of Utah. Depending on the nature of prior graduate
work, the doctoral degree will require between 60 and 82 credit hours, or more, and extend a minimum of
six full time semesters of course work. Along with rigorous admission standards, admitted students will
have posed a clear direction in pursuing doctoral studies.

The doctoral degree includes core, dissertation field, qualifying examination, and dissertation benchmarks.
The core is composed of a sequence of semester-long doctoral seminars in metropolitan planning,
metropolitan policy, metropolitan design, research design, technical writing, and teaching methods for a
total of 18 credits. Doctoral students will complete a minimum of 24 credits in a “dissertation” field including
courses outside the Department. (Students without a master degree in planning will need to take up to 22
credits in core planning courses.) The qualifying examination will demonstrate the ability of the candidate to
undertake independent research through the preparation of a paper sufficient for submission to a scholarly
journal; the paper itself will include literature review, theory, research design, research execution, findings,
and conclusions. The dissertation will then be proposed, prepared, and defended.

Mission
The Mountain West (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming) is the
nation’s most urbanized region as well as its fastest growing. By 2040, the region will double in population
to more than 30 million people with nearly 20 million jobs. Most of the existing built environment will be
rebuilt. Sustainable development is an imperative more so in the Mountain West than perhaps any other
region. The region must also learn to be resilient in the face of global climate change, limited water supply,
problematic air sheds, and fragile landscapes. The Ph.D. in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design at
the University of Utah will prepare the next generations of scholars and researchers for the interdisciplinary
challenges of shaping metropolitan areas so they are sustainable and resilient. Given this challenge, the
role of the degree in the future of the region and the nation is reflected in its title: The planning challenge is to anticipate change and learn how best to manage it; the policy challenge is how to craft and implement policies needed to facilitate desired change; and the design challenge is how to shape the built
environment to achieve desired outcomes.

The mission of the Ph.D. in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design is to produce doctoral graduates who
will serve the people of Utah and the world through the discovery, creation and application of knowledge;
through the dissemination of knowledge by teaching, publication …; and through community engagement
(italicized language from the University Mission Statement).The core curriculum and matriculation
benchmarks are designed to facilitate discovery and knowledge creation. The program is designed to
facilitate dissemination of knowledge through research, teaching, publishing, and engagement.

Program Description
The Ph.D. in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design is designed to serve three groups of students, but
do so in a way in which the interdisciplinary culture of the University of Utah is advanced. One group of
students are those in planning, usually having completed an accredited master of planning degree at Utah
or elsewhere. The second are students with masters degrees in fields related to planning especially at Utah
such as Geography, Sociology, Family and Consumer Studies (including demography and community
development), Public Policy, Public Administration, Political Science, and Economics, among others.

Included in this group are graduate Architecture students for whom metropolitan design may be their only
option for doctoral study. The doctoral degree may also be attractive to a third group of students who have
graduate degrees from other Utah universities, such as the Master of Landscape Architecture and Master
of Natural Resources degrees at Utah State University, and the Master of Public Administration and Public
Policy degrees at Brigham Young University.

The doctoral program will be available to students on a full-time and part-time basis. In either case,
admission will be selective (see below) to (a) assure the number of students being managed by the faculty
is never very large and that (b) those admitted have demonstrated their ability to complete demanding,
long-term commitments within a reasonable period of time.

The Ph.D. in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design will be guided by a particular philosophy. Students
entering the program will demonstrate a clear purpose in pursuing doctoral studies; this assures direction in
students’ doctoral work. Second, they will demonstrate their ability to complete challenging projects. Third,
students’ interests will be highly correlated with several faculty members to assure a critical mass of
mentoring. Finally, a least one member of the faculty will be the principal mentor including chairing relevant
student doctoral committees and seeking funding support if needed. The objective is to assemble a group
of highly motivated, self-directed, and talented students who show great promise to complete the degree
and succeed in society after graduation.

Requirements for completing the Ph.D. in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design are as follows:

Ph.D. Supervisory Committee
Upon admission, a Ph.D. Supervisory Committee will be formed consisting of five or more faculty members.
The committee chair and the majority of the committee must be regular faculty in the student’s department.
One member of the committee will be from another department at Utah. Other members may be external to
the university where their expertise is relevant to the student’s anticipated dissertation topic.

All University of Utah faculty members (including regular, research, clinical, emeritus, visiting, and adjunct)
are eligible to serve as supervisory committee members. The faculty member must hold an academic or
professional doctorate, the terminal degree in the relevant field, and/or must have demonstrated
competence to do research and scholarly or artistic work in the student’s general field. Persons not from
the University of Utah may also serve as committee members upon approval of the dean of The Graduate
School (a vita for the proposed committee members should accompany the request).

Exceptions to these guidelines must be recommended and justified by the director of graduate studies of
the department or the department chair, depending on departmental policies, and approved by the dean of
The Graduate School. The process of forming a supervisory committee is completed by filing a Request for
Supervisory Committee form with the major department.

The Supervisory Committee will be responsible for approving the student’s academic program, approving
the qualifying examination (qualifying paper), approving the dissertation research proposal, and
administering the final oral examination (dissertation defense). Each time a revised document is submitted
for feedback and approval to members of the Supervisory Committee, the student should allow a minimum
of 2 weeks for feedback. Committee members should take no longer than 4 weeks to provide feedback on
submitted work. Oral presentation of the qualifying paper, dissertation proposal, and dissertation shall be
open to other students and faculty of the College.

Program of Study
Doctoral students will complete a minimum of six semesters of full time course work as approved by the
Supervisory Committee and reflected in an approved Program of Study. At least one year (i.e., two
consecutive semesters) of the doctoral program must be spent in full-time academic work at the University
of Utah. When a student proceeds directly from a master’s degree to a Ph.D. degree with no break in the
program of study (except for authorized leaves of absence), the residency requirement may be fulfilled at
any time during the course of study. A full load is nine credit hours. Three hours of Ph.D. Dissertation
Research (CMP 7970) also is considered a full load after the residency requirement is fulfilled.

Graduate Planning Foundations
For students with an accredited planning master degree from Utah or elsewhere, the graduate planning
core is waived. For those without this degree, the graduate planning core is required although individual
courses may be waived by the Supervisory Committee based on comparable graduate work at Utah or
elsewhere. For most students without an accredited planning degree, completing the core planning courses
will require the equivalent of about one full academic year of study.

Maximum credits = 22

Doctoral Foundations
Subject to the needs of individual doctoral students as determined by the Supervisory Committee, each
doctoral student will satisfactorily complete the following core courses:
CMP 7022 – Quantitative Methods in Planning
CMP 7100 – Urban Theory & Form
CMP 7201 – Metropolitan Policy Seminar
CMP 7301 – Qualitative Methods for Planners and Designers
CMP 7401 – Research Design for Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design
CMP 7502 – Topics in City & Metropolitan Planning Pedagogy
CMP 7503 – Topics in Writing in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design
Minimum credits = 21

doctoral_cmpchart

Field Study
Working with the Supervisory Committee, a selection of courses including independent study will be
identified providing sufficient foundation for the student to pursue the dissertation topic. Depending on the
topic, many courses may be taken outside the College. Relevant courses would be those in theory,
methods, processes, and foundations related to the dissertation topic. While a minimum number of credits
are expected, this may vary depending on the level of preparation by the student as determined by the
Supervisory Committee.
Minimum credits = 12 (most of which are expected to be outside the department)
Language Requirement
Unless determined as necessary by the Supervisory Committee based on the nature of the dissertation
work anticipated, there will be no language requirement other than English proficiency.
Qualifying Examination
The qualifying (preliminary) examination will be unique among doctoral programs nationally in that a
publishable scholarly work will be the written product and reviewed orally with the Supervisory Committee.
The philosophy is that since a key skill of a doctoral graduate is to disseminate knowledge through
scholarly work, the very best way to demonstrate mastery of this skill, and thus ability to continue on to the
dissertation, is to write such a work. Together with the Supervisory Committee, the topic for preparing a
scholarly, publishable work will be identified along with prospective sources of data and literature. The
student will then have a prescribed period of time to produce the scholarly work. It will include a review of
relevant theory, discussion of the research design appropriate for the theory and data or other forms of
information, application of the selected research method, findings, and conclusions including relevant
metropolitan planning, policy, and design implications. After oral review it is anticipated that students will
refine their qualifying examination product and submit it to an appropriate peer-reviewed journal for its
consideration. To facilitate this unique approach to doctoral preparation, students will enroll for at least six
credit hours of independent study (CMP 7950). Students may only register for six credits of CMP 7950 in
one semester for the purpose of completing their qualifying examination, and there must be a formal
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agreement between the student and his/her committee chair prior to being approved to take six credit hours
of independent study.
Minimum credits = 6
Dissertation Research Proposal
Candidates will prepare and defend their proposal for a dissertation based on the plan and format
negotiated with the Supervisory Committee. The design for the proposal itself may be commenced at any
time. A minimum of 3 credits is required.
CMP 7970 – Ph.D. Dissertation Research – variable 1-12 credits per semester but minimum 3
credits needed to satisfy the dissertation research proposal requirement (Course to be proposed
upon approval of the doctoral degree)
Minimum credits = 3
Dissertation
After approval a dissertation proposal by the Supervisory Committee, the candidate must then prepare,
submit and defend a dissertation embodying the results of scientific or scholarly research or artistic
creativity. The dissertation will provide evidence of originality and the ability to do independent investigation
and it must contribute to knowledge. A minimum of 18 credits in dissertation research will be required.
However, the timing of those credits may be negotiated with the Supervisory Committee.
CMP 7970 – Ph.D. Dissertation Research – variable 1-12 credits per semester (Course to be
proposed upon approval of the doctoral degree)
Minimum credits = 18
Students are required to write and defend their dissertation in order to graduate from the program.
Typically, dissertations are a written work on a singular topic including multiple chapters, such as
Introduction, Literature Review, Research Methods, Results, Discussion/Conclusion.
The doctoral committee will also consider a three discrete paper dissertation option as an exception to this
traditional dissertation (in addition to the scholarly paper necessary for the Qualifying Examination).
Students pursuing a three-paper dissertation must obtain approval from their committee before proceeding
and must announce their intent to do so by the end of their second year. Students pursuing a three paper
dissertation are also subject to the following rules:
1. The three papers must be deemed publishable in peer-reviewed journals by a majority of the
committee.
2. It is expected that the three papers will be on related topics, such that they can be placed in a
volume with introductory and concluding chapters.
3. Co-authorship of the papers in the dissertation is permitted, provided that the student is the first
author on all papers and is responsible for the full writing of all of the papers. If it is found that a
significant portion of a paper was not written by the student, the committee may prohibit that paper
from being included in the dissertation.
4. All dissertations must conform to the formatting requirements outlined in the Graduate School’s
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Handbook for Theses and Dissertations (available at: gradschool.utah.edu/thesis). If the threepaper
option is selected, then the student must obtain a release from any coauthor(s) and must
follow the rules outlined in Appendix B of the Handbook regarding the use of previously published
material.
According to the policies of the Graduate School at the University of Utah, students must submit their
defended dissertations to the Thesis Office well before the date of graduation. For the 2014-2015 academic
year, the deadlines for submission of a defended dissertation manuscript are:
Students must be registered for at least one credit of CMP 7970 during the semester in which they defend
and submit their dissertation.
Total Credits Needed for Graduation
In review, for doctoral students who have an accredited master of planning degree, the Ph.D. in
Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design will require as many as 60 credits or more; for other doctoral
students as many as 82 credits or more may be needed.
Timelines
It is important to the department and the university that the students progress through their doctoral
programs in a timely way. CMP has limited funds to support students, and quotas for admission of new
students are based on the numbers continuing in the program. A PhD student has seven calendar years
from the date of first registration to complete the doctoral degree with an approved dissertation. In addition,
students must advance to candidacy by the end of five years. Advancing to candidacy includes having an
approved dissertation proposal and completing the qualifying paper. This timeline applies to both full- and
part-time students entering the doctoral program with a Master’s degree.
If a PhD student enters the program without a Master’s degree in planning, then the student will have nine
calendar years from the date of first registration to complete the doctoral degree with an approved
dissertation. Students without a Master’s degree must advance to candidacy by the end of seven years.
Years to:
Full-time student
with Master’s
Part-time student
with Master’s
Full-time student
without Master’s
Part-time student
without Master’s
Advance to
Candidacy
5 5 7 7
Graduate 7 7 9 9
Semester of Graduation
Last day submissions will be
accepted to begin the format
approval process
Last day approved manuscripts
will be accepted to begin the
thesis release process
Spring 2015 March 13 April 27
Summer 2015 Jun 12 July 27
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Admission
Applicants are normally expected to have a master degree in or related broadly to the fields of planning,
policy, and/or design; but this will not be exclusive. We will have a selective doctoral program drawing
students generally in the 60th percentile or higher of peer institutions based on GRE scores. (Consideration
will be made that normally GREs are taken for master and not doctoral degree admission. Consideration
will also be made of accomplishments since graduate education indicating preparedness for doctoral
studies.) The resume, two letters of reference, writing and/or other portfolio samples, statement of interest,
presentation of a dissertation topic, and where feasible campus visits will be used to gauge suitability for
doctoral work at the University.
The Doctoral Admissions Committee will carefully screen all applications, and all admissions decisions will
be made by consensus of the entire faculty. At least one faculty member must agree to supervise any
applicant whose record meets admissions requirements before they will receive a formal offer of admission.
Student Advisement
Student advisement will be consistent with the established advising practices within the Department of City
& Metropolitan Planning for MCMP students. Each doctoral student will be advised by at least one faculty
member who will also facilitate financial support during doctoral studies. We will update the Department
Graduate Handbook to reflect the doctoral degree.
Program Curriculum
The table below sorts courses by doctoral core and the three thematic areas. A few courses at the 6000
level cut across all three thematic area. CMP 7000-level are to proposed. Variable (“Var”) credit courses
have no minimum number of hours available to doctoral students. All University graduate students are
eligible to take CMP 7000-level courses with instructor approval. Graduate City & Metropolitan Planning
students may take such courses as credit toward their master degree subject to their approved Program of
Study.
The Supervisory Committee will determine which of the courses listed below, or others, are sufficient
preparation for dissertation work. It is anticipated that all students will take several courses in planning
along with courses outside City & Metropolitan Planning, and that students without an accredited graduate
degree in planning may take more. The list is illustrative of how students may tailor doctoral studies, and is
subject to change. The categories are not necessarily exclusive; many courses cut across multiple fields.
Continuous Registration
According to the Graduate School policy, “all graduate students must be registered for at least one course
from the time of formal admission through completion of all requirements for the degree they are seeking,
unless granted an official leave of absence.” The City & Metropolitan Planning department allows that a 1-
credit hour course is sufficient to meet this requirement.
For more information, please see gradschool.utah.edu/graduate-catalog/registration/.
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Course Prefix Credit
& Number Title Hours
Core
CMP 7022 Quantitative Methods in Planning 3
CMP 7100 Urban Theory & Form 3
CMP 7201 Metropolitan Policy Seminar 3
CMP 7301 Qualitative Methods for Planners and Designers 3
CMP 7401 Research Design in Metropolitan Planning, Policy & Design 3
CMP 7502 Pedagogy Seminar 3
CMP 7503 Technical Writing 3
CMP 7970 Research and Dissertation 21
Total number of fixed credits 21
Minimum credits needed in core 42
Metropolitan Planning
CMP 7501 Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design Research Seminar Var
CMP 6010 Urban Research 3
CMP 6011 Planning Seminar 1
CMP 6020 Urban and Regional Analysis 3
CMP 6040 Physical Plan Analysis 3
CMP 6200 Urbanization 3
CMP 6220 Land Use Planning 3
CMP 6260 Land Use Law 3
CMP 6270 Metropolitan Regional Planning 3
CMP 6280 Graduate Workshop 4
CMP 6330 Urban Growth Management 3
CMP 6340 Public/Private Interests in Land Development 3
CMP 6371 Complexity and Systems Thinking 3
CMP 6390 Sustainability Planning 3
CMP 6430 Technology in Planning 3
CMP 6720 Community Transport 3
CVEEN 6540 Community Transportation 3
CVEEN 6110 GIS Applications in Civil & Enviro. Engineering 3
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Course Prefix Credit
& Number Title Hours
Metropolitan Planning (continued)
CVEEN 6540 Community Transportation 3
CVEEN 6560 Transportation II 3
CVEEN 7545 Transportation Modeling 3
CVEEN 7590 Public Transportation Systems 3
GEOG 6140 Methods in Geographic Information Systems 4
H EDU 6550 Introduction to Research Methodology 3
H EDU 6560 Experimental Design and Analysis 3
H EDU 6600 Introduction to Health Research Design 3
H EDU 6610 Evidence Based Health Research 3
H EDU 6660 Health Service Administration Seminar 2
H EDU 6700 Epidemiology in Community Health Practice 3
FCS 6100 Graduate Research Methods 4
FCS 6110 Graduate Multivariate Statistics 4
FCS 6120 Demographic Methods 3
PRT 6000 Survey of Parks, Recreation and Tourism 3
PRT 6050 Environmental Ethics 2
PRT 6070 Seminar in Outdoor Recreation Management 3
PRT 6410 Park Planning 2
PRT 6420 Ecology and Management of Wildland Recreation Settings 3
PRT 6800 Graduate Seminar in Parks, Recreation and Tourism 1
PRT 6965 On-Site Policy Analysis 3
PRT 7000 Seminar in History and Philosophy of Leisure 2
PRT 7010 Behavioral Science Foundations of Parks, Recreation and Tourism 3
PRT 7100 Theory Development, Trends, and Issues in PRT 6
PRT 7101 Measurement in Parks, Recreation and Tourism 3
PRT 7102 Behavioral Science Process in PRT I 3
PRT 7103 Behavioral Science Process in PRT II 3
PRT 7104 Behavioral Science Process in PRT III 3
PRT 7105 Concepts and Application of Hierarchical Linear Modeling in PRT 3
SOC 6120 Statistics I 3
SOC 7130 Statistics II 3
Total number of credits 141+
Metropolitan Policy
CMP 6010 Urban Research 3
CMP 6011 Planning Seminar 1
CMP 6030 Leadership & Public Participation 3
CMP 6240 Planning Theory and Ethics 3
CMP 6260 Land Use Law 3
CMP 6280 Graduate Workshop 4
CMP 6300 Housing and Community Development 3
CMP 6310 Urban Development Policy and Method 3
10
Course Prefix Credit
& Number Title Hours
Metropolitan Policy (continued)
CMP 6320 Metropolitan Fiscal Analysis 3
CMP 6350 Public Lands and Environmental Policy 3
CMP 6360 Environmental Planning Law and Policy 3
CMP 6370 System Dynamics and Environmental Policy 3
CMP 6500 Project Finance and Economics 3
CMP 6600 Politics of Planning 3
ECON 6300 Public Finance: Public Expenditures and Cost-Benefit Analysis 3
ECON 6380 Law and Economics 3
ECON 6180 Poverty and Inequality 3
ECON 6240 Urban Economics 3
ECON 6250 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics 3
FCS 6300 Housing and Community Development 3
FCS 6730 Community & Environmental Change 3
FCS 6200 Families and Social Policy 3
FCS 6400 Families and Economic Policy 3
FCS 6450 Nonprofit Community Organizations 1-3
FCS 6563 Program and Policy Evaluation 3
FP MD 6100 Biostatistics I 3
FP MD 6101 Data Analysis using SAS 3
FP MD 6105 Advanced Topics in Epidemiology and Biostatistics 2
FP MD 6301 Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology 3
FP MD 6305 Advanced Methods Epidemiology Research 3
FP MD 6309 Seminar in Epidemological and Biostatistical Techniques 1
FP MD 6311 Research Design 3
FP MD 6340 Infectious Disease Epidemiology 3
FP MD 6370 Occupational Epidemiology 3
FP MD 6400 Public Health Administration 3
FP MD 6401 Public Health Policy and Health Systems 3
FP MD 6405 Health Services Research 2
FP MD 6500 Introduction to Public Health 3
FP MD 6520 HIV/AIDS and Public Health 4
FP MD 6550 Health Programs Planning and Implementation 3
FP MD 6600 Social Context of Medicine and Public Health 3
FP MD 6602 Community Analysis 1-2
FP MD 6700 Environmental Public Health 3
PADMN 6290 Applied Quantitative Methods in Public Policy 3
PADMN 6322 Environmental Policy 3
PADMN 6323 Policy Analysis 3
PADMN 6563 Program and Policy Evaluation 3
SOC 6110 Methods of Social Research 3
SOC 6115 Sociological Analysis 3
SOC 6340 Social Stratification 3
SOC 7070 Seminar in Population and Health 3
SOC 7921 Population and Health Readings I 3
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Course Prefix
& Number Title Hours
Metropolitan Policy (continued)
SOC 7922 Population and Health Readings II 3
PUBPL 6900 Public Policy Research 3
Total number of credits 159+/-
Metropolitan Design
CMP 6011 Planning Seminar 1
CMP 6280 Graduate Workshop 4
CMP 6400 Urban Design Visualization 3
CMP 6410 Site Planning 3
CMP 6420 Open Space Design 3
CMP 6390 Sustainability Planning 3
CMP 6430 Technology in Planning 3
ARCH 6230 Utah Architecture and Cities 3
ARCH 6235 American Suburban Development 3
ARCH 6262 Urban Design Theory 3
ARCH 6500 Preservation Theory and Practice 3
ARCH 6581 “Main Street” Revitalization 3
ARCH 6851 Societal Change, Architecture and Planning 3
FCS 6620 Advanced Environment and Behavior 3
FCS 6650 Advanced Community Psychology 3
FCS 6630 Healthy Communities 3
FCS 6700 Research for Community Needs 3
FCS 6600 Environments and Human Behavior 3
FCS 6730 Community Development & Environmental Change 3
GEOG 6000 Spatial Statistics 3
GEOG 6140 Methods in Geographic Information Systems 4
GEOG 6160 Spatial Modeling with GIS 3
GEOG 6190 GIS & Environmental Health 3
GEOG 6240 Locational Analysis 3
Total number of credits 81+
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Sample Schedule of Courses (subject to change)
Students with Accredited Master of Planning Degree
Course Prefix Credit
& Number Title Hours
First Fall Semester
CMP 7100 Urban Theory & Form 3
CMP 7503 Topics in Writing in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design 3
CMP 7022 Quantitative Methods in Planning 3
Elective/Dissertation Field 3
Total credits towards meeting degree requirements 12
First Spring Semester
CMP 7201 Metropolitan Policy Seminar 3
CMP 7301 Qualitative Methods for Planners and Designers 3
Elective/Dissertation Field 3
Elective/Dissertation Field 3
Total credits, minimum 12
Second Fall Semester
CMP 7502 Topics in City & Metropolitan Planning Pedagogy 3
Elective/Dissertation Field 3
Elective/Dissertation Field 3
Total credits, minimum 9
Second Spring Semester
CMP 7401 Research Design in Metropolitan Planning, Policy & Design 3
CMP 6950 Independent Study (qualifying examination) 6
Total credits, minimum 9
Second Summer Semester (dissertation proposal)
CMP 7970 Research and Dissertation 3
(Dissertation proposal approved by Supervisory Committee)
Total credits, minimum 3
Third Fall Semester
CMP 7970 Research and Dissertation 9
Total credits 9
Third Spring Semester (dissertation defended at end of spring)
CMP 7970 Research and Dissertation 9
Total credits 9
Total credits toward meeting degree requirements 63
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Students without an Accredited Master of Planning Degree
Course Prefix Credit
& Number Title Hours
First Fall Semester
CMP 6430 Planning Communications 3
CMP 6450 GIS in Planning 3
CMP 6100/7100 Urban Theory & Form 3
Total credits 9
First Spring Semester
CMP 6010 Urban Research 3
CMP 6260 Land Use Law 3
CMP 6610 Urban Ecology 3
Total credits 9
Second Fall Semester
CMP 6240 Reason Power and Values 3
CMP 6322 City & Metropolitan Economics 3
CMP 7503 Topics in Writing in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design 3
CMP 7022 Quantitative Methods in Planning 3
Total credits towards meeting degree requirements 12
Second Spring Semester
CMP 7201 Metropolitan Policy Seminar 3
CMP 7301 Qualitative Methods for Planners and Designers 3
Elective/Dissertation Field 3
Elective/Dissertation Field 3
Total credits, minimum 12
Third Fall Semester
CMP 7502 Topics in City & Metropolitan Planning Pedagogy 3
Elective/Dissertation Field 3
Elective/Dissertation Field 3
Total credits, minimum 9
Third Spring Semester
CMP 7401 Research Design in Metropolitan Planning, Policy & Design 3
CMP 6950 Independent Study (qualifying examination) 6
Total credits, minimum 9
Third Summer Semester (dissertation proposal)
CMP 7970 Research and Dissertation 3
(Dissertation proposal approved by Supervisory Committee)
Total credits, minimum 3
Fourth Fall Semester
CMP 7970 Research and Dissertation 9
Total credits 9
Fourth Spring Semester (dissertation defended at end of spring)
CMP 7970 Research and Dissertation 9
Total credits 9
Total credits toward meeting degree requirements 81
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Advanced Courses in City & Metropolitan Planning
CMP 7022 Quantitative Methods in Planning (3)
Lab based course in planning research and quantitative methods including the application of various
methodologies to different topic areas including factor analysis, logistic regression, hierarchical modeling,
and structural equation modeling.
CMP 7100 Urban Theory & Form (3)
Introductory survey course about theories of urbanism, urban formation, spatial structure, comparative
urbanism, the dynamics of urban areas, contemporary urban challenges, economic restructuring and
globalism, and strategic responses for evolving human settlements. The course also covers the history of
urban form and city-making from a design and planning standpoint.
CMP 7201 Metropolitan Policy Seminar (1-6)
The purpose of the Metropolitan Policy Seminar is to give students the opportunity to convert their current
work and/or interests into a small scholarly paper suitable for presentation to a scholarly conference and/or
submission to a scholarly journal. This course combines elements of preparing students for professional
oral presentation in scholarly forums, providing instruction on writing and preparing journal articles, and a
simulation of the journal submission and review process.
CMP 7301 Qualitative Methods for Planners and Designers (3)
This hybrid seminar-lecture course provides an overview of the qualitative methods that are used most
commonly by planners and designers in urban research. Each course session will focus on a specific
qualitative method area, which includes discussion of rationale, data collection, analysis, technique,
contextual application, protocols and process, language, outcomes and issues. Over the semester,
qualitative methods will be discussed in terms of larger research design and methodological strategies, and
illustrated with models and cases to provide example. Issues of voice, subjectivity, culture, identity, and
assumptions will provide a contextual filter for the qualitative researcher in choosing and applying specific
methods. Students will apply several methods in the qualitative analysis and understanding of a single
urban case.
CMP 7401 Research Design in Metropolitan Planning, Policy & Design (1-4)
Designing research strategies for application to metropolitan scale issues including such topics as
identifying the available and nature of data, primary and second data assembly, design of quantitative and
qualitative methods, execution through proposals and research, preparing and presentation research
results, and related topics. Credits are based on the number and/or in-depth treatment of policy areas
addressed. Variable credit. Students may take this seminar multiple times for up to 6 total credits.
CMP 7502 Topics in City & Metropolitan Planning Pedagogy (1 to 4)
Instructive theory; theories of learning; pedagogical strategies for teaching in city and metropolitan
planning; course syllabus preparation; methods of course delivery and learning modes; student
assessment; course evaluation; and related topics. Variable credit. Students may take this course multiple
times for up to 6 total credits.
CMP 7503 Topics in Writing in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design (1 to 4)
Models and applications of writing for future scholars in researchers in metropolitan planning, policy and
design, and related fields, for: professional and academic journals; books, book chapters and monographs;
15
book reviews and review essays; proposal writing; report preparation; and related topics. Variable credit.
Students may take this course multiple times for up to 6 total credits.
CMP 7950 Independent Studies (1 to 3)
CMP 7960 Special Topics (1 to 3)
Special topics class for advanced studies. This course is the mechanism through which students can be
exposed to “cutting edge” content from visiting professors who are experts in specifics facets of scholarship
in Metropolitan Planning, Policy and Design.
CMP 7970 Dissertation (1 to 12)
CMP 7980 Faculty Consultation (1 to 3)
Faculty consultation on advanced research.
CMP 7990 Continuing Registration (0)
Continuing registration.